How we go about achieving our goals can be as unique as each of us.  That’s why its important to avoid quick-fix solutions.  There are many right ways – not just one.  Figuring out your “right way” is what matters.   First, understand what you want to achieve, why and what your unique process looks like.  Dig into your past […]

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Asking for and getting feedback is hard.  Most people never do it – even though conventional wisdom is that feedback makes us better and helps us achieve our goals.  To get the full advantage of feedback, it’s a good idea to think through the entire process — from asking to implementing. Let’s assume that you’ve asked for […]

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Walk into just about any coffee shop and you’ll see people with their devices working remotely.  Just as there’s office etiquette, the Wall Street Journal says there’s also coffee shop etiquette – etiquette that will help ensure you’re always welcome at your favorite java joint. Work only where and when you’re wanted.  Not all coffee houses want […]

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If you’re sitting at your desk, or standing at your workstation, doing the minimum, hoping the day will end soon, too bad!  You’re dying a slow death, and you’re contributing to the demise of your employer.  Anyone can have a temporary slump.  You just don’t have much energy and, in a way, you don’t even care.  You feel […]

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Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs teaches us that a sense of belonging is central. Given that basic human need, it’s not surprising that those who feel threatened by social and economic changes, like outsiders who are no longer central, are speaking out more and more.  When people feel ignored or undervalued, several things can happen. They might turn […]

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In a 2018 blog post, author Frank Sonnenberg shared 15 phrases that communicate a bad attitude.  Here are a few.  If you catch yourself about to say any of them, stop, take a deep breath and find another way to communicate your message.  “They don’t pay me enough to do this.” “I’ve always done it this way.” […]

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During the Q&A, a participant said, “I’m always running late, and I don’t know why. I try to be on time, but it seems like I never am.” Then, she asked, “Why is that?” BIG question…profound question.

The answer appears to be obvious: plan better. Agreed?! Valid perspective; one that probably applies to many of us. But, this answer only scratches the surface. There’s more to uncover.

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The learning-to-love-failure movement is a growing one.   New York Times contributor Rachel Simmons writes that accepting failure and moving on takes practice.  She offers three ways to teach yourself how to get up after a disappointment or an outright fiasco.   Simmons advises her Smith College students to ask themselves, “What’s the worst that can happen,”followed by three more […]

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When we believe we’ve failed at something, it’s easy to fall into a pit of despair.  But according to New York Times contributor Rachel Simmons, accepting failure and moving on is a learned behavior.  One way she suggests teaching ourselves to “get over it” is by practicing self compassion. Here’s how. Note how you feel.  Don’t exaggerate or deny […]

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Mistakes.  We all make them.  What’s important is how we deal with them so that our errors don’t become our undoing. New York Times Better Living Columnist Tim Herrera has some tips for moving beyond big and little gaffes. He recommends being honest with yourself.  Acknowledge that it was indeed a mistake.  Accept it, but don’t let it define you […]

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Whether I’m watching Serena Williams, Roger Federer, Tiger Woods, Phil Mickelson, Nick Foles, Bryce Harper or Joel Embiid, I notice how they do what they do — the mechanical and mental aspects of their performance.     An important lesson — one many of us can learn from — is the resilience of those at the top of […]

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Forbes.com contributor Mark Murphy says that about 25% of the population are intuitive communicators.  They prefer knowing the big picture and getting to the bottom line, quickly.  Intuitive communicators enjoy a disproportionately high representation among senior leaders.    To test whether you’re an intuitive communicator, Murphy says to think back on a recent conversation and ask yourself three […]

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In a recent Forbes.com article, Travis Bradberry listed and explained 13 powerful psychological forces that make us do bad things.  This list can help us become more self-aware and it may also help us better understand the people around us.  Those with whom we live, work and play.  First, the winner-take-all competition— something our society encourages, but it […]

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Good self-awareness includes knowing how invisible, powerful forces can lead to making bad, unethical choices.  Forbes.com contributor Travis Bradberry recently shared some of these outside-of-our-awareness influences and how they can affect us. The compensation effect. Using good deeds to justify bad ones. If people perform the acts of a good person, they might feel justified in sometimes behaving […]

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Your thoughts can make or break you. What you think affects how you feel.  Together, thoughts and feelings shape your life because they influence your behavior and determine what you see as possible.  The process you use to identify or recognize opportunities becomes a closed loop – life-defining and self-reinforcing.  Your imagination becomes more and more […]

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A standard question asked in job interviews is “What are your strengths and weaknesses?”  How you answer that question can reveal more than what may appear on the surface.   Answering the strengths part is often easy.  You likely have a good sense of what you do well and can express it positively.  But when explaining your weaknesses, rather […]

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While Business Insider’s list of seven things people who’ve hit success milestones by age 35 have mastered isn’t groundbreaking, little reminders are always helpful, no matter your age. It’s okay to ask for advice. Let go of that fear of not having the answers.  The world is complicated and no one knows everything.   Dedicate time every […]

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Harvard Business Review contributors Tony Schwartz and Emily Pines of the Energy Project warn that at all times, we have two selves operating simultaneously.  There’s the self governed by our pre-frontal cortex.  It controls executive brain functions like planning and strategy. It’s calm, measured and rational.  This is the self of which we are most aware.    Our other […]

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