Do you suffer from analysis paralysis?  Do you struggle to make big decisions because the unknown scares you or deciding now feels like too big a commitment?  Here are 3 ways New York Times contributor Susan Shain says you can spend less time agonizing and more time enjoying. Go for Good Enough. Today, we’re assaulted with endless options.  You […]

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Insomnia can do more than make you tired throughout your day.  According to McKinsey and Company, it can impact your cognitive abilities and overall quality of life.  They offer three solutions to help you fall and stay asleep. Read for fun. Select material that has nothing to do with work.  Choose something you’re personally interested in but haven’t had […]

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The learning-to-love-failure movement is a growing one.   New York Times contributor Rachel Simmons writes that accepting failure and moving on takes practice.  She offers three ways to teach yourself how to get up after a disappointment or an outright fiasco.   Simmons advises her Smith College students to ask themselves, “What’s the worst that can happen,”followed by three more […]

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When we believe we’ve failed at something, it’s easy to fall into a pit of despair.  But according to New York Times contributor Rachel Simmons, accepting failure and moving on is a learned behavior.  One way she suggests teaching ourselves to “get over it” is by practicing self compassion. Here’s how. Note how you feel.  Don’t exaggerate or deny […]

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Imposter Syndrome — that feeling that you don’t belong or aren’t qualified – is heightened for women and people of color.  The New York Times’ Working Women’s Handbook says it disproportionately affects anyone who feels the pressure of accomplishing “firsts.” The handbook offers four ways to combat Imposter Syndrome.   Make a list of 10 things that show […]

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Former First Lady Michelle Obama is quoted as saying, “Eventually, I just got tired of always worrying what everyone else thought of me.  So, I decided not to listen.” She stopped reacting to the real or perceived opinions of others. She achieved something most women haven’t.  Over eons, women have been conditioned to see and present […]

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Harvard Business Review contributors Tony Schwartz and Emily Pines of the Energy Project warn that at all times, we have two selves operating simultaneously.  There’s the self governed by our pre-frontal cortex.  It controls executive brain functions like planning and strategy. It’s calm, measured and rational.  This is the self of which we are most aware.    Our other […]

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Living in the present sounds like such a simple goal – unless you’ve tried it.  If you have, you know how difficult fully experiencing NOW can be.  In our professional and personal lives, it seems like a luxury to stop and focus exclusively on what we’re doing right here, right now.  Too often, we devote too much time […]

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BusinessInsider.com recently spoke to CEO’s who’ve done thousands of interviews about the things that catch their attention when meeting with job candidates. Here are a few of them. How you greet them and how you leave them.  Does your body language convey confidence and charisma?  Does your style of engaging indicate you can work successfully in a team […]

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In a recent blog post, Dr. Anne Litwin responded to eye-opening findings from LeanIn.org and the McKinsey group.  The report found that 1 in 5 of the women they surveyed at 279 US companies consider themselves “Onlys” — meaning they are often the only woman in the room. Half of those women say they must provide […]

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Who’s calling the shots in your life?  The answer may surprise you. The feeling of having lost control over ones time and energy utilization has reached epidemic proportions.  For many, it feels like someone else is in the driver’s seat…your job, your calendar, demands of family life, previous commitments that have taken on a life of their […]

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As you contemplate what you’d like to do differently in 2019, I urge you to consider a resolution for self-kindness. Yes, focus on things like fitness and your career, AND look at ways you can turn your attention within to create inner peace and self-directed happiness. Resolve to say “no” more often.  When requests make you uncomfortable […]

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Wondering how you might handle heated conversations during this, the season of workplace holiday parties? Business Insider consulted Dr. Michael McNulty, master trainer and founder of the Chicago Relationhip Center. He offered this timely advice in the event that you find yourself in an unavoidable debate. Try turning the argument into a dialogue. McNulty says […]

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A while ago, I came across a quote that stuck with me. It read, “A quiet mind is able to hear intuition over fear.” I stumbled onto this quote at a time when my mind was racing with thoughts of daily life. People were tugging at me from various directions. Internally, I was putting pressure […]

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My book LIES That Limit, and much of my work, revolves around the labels, illusions, excuses and stories we tell ourselves. These LIES don’t just keep us from becoming successful, they keep successful people from achieving genuine happiness. When I encounter a client who has reached a breaking point, it’s usually because they have woven and are […]

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Report after report reminds us how important it is to be self-aware. One of the foundational components of Emotional Intelligence, self-awareness enables us to know our triggers, and what it takes for us to open our minds to new and different experiences and people. To become more self-aware, regularly, take a few minutes to connect […]

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 While some people are great delegators, many struggle with trusting others to do as good a job as they do. Try looking at delegation as a teaching opportunity. According to the Harvard Business Review, here are some steps you can take in that direction. Don’t wait until you’re overwhelmed or going on vacation to […]

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